dominican republic

What to pack for your trip to the Dominican Republic

The Dominican Republic has a tropical climate, hot all year round, with a hotter and muggy season from May to October, and a relatively cool season from December to March. The rainy season, which compared to other Caribbean islands is relatively short, is from September to December and not very intense.

Loose and breathable clothes. Wear loose and breathable clothes that are comfortable in the humid heat and dry quickly when wet from either sweat or rain. Ideal are lightweight hoodies like the highly weatherproof Arc'teryx Squamish jacket, which is breathable, too – handy for when the weather clears up again.

Mosquito and sun protection. Along with an effective bug repellent and great sunscreen, bring a wide-brimmed hat – when the sun is out in the Caribbean it's strong year-round. Tilley's LTM6 AirFlo Hat is stylish enough to wear in the city, but also keep you cool and provide a convenient perch for a personal mosquito net, quite handy in the rainforest and jungle areas of Yucatan, like this one from Outdoor Research.

Don't forget your swimwear! You’ll also want a comfortable, easily adjusted pair of goggles, like Aqua Sphere goggles and a space-saving microfiber towel like the Sea to Summit DryLite towel. A pair of sandals, like Chaco's Z/VOLV or Ecotread, will give you better traction on wet surfaces than a standard pair of flip-flops.

Power adapter and charger. The Dominican Republic uses U.S. style power plugs type A and B. The standard voltage is 110 V and the standard frequency is 60 Hz. Type A and B power adapters are included in this world adapter set from Bestek, and a multiport charger, like Anker’s compact Powerport 4.

Packing cubes. They not only keep your suitcase organized, but also compact your clothes to save space. One of frequent travellers'favorites are Eagle Creek‘s Pack-It cubes, which come in different sizes so you can tailor your setup to your needs.

Travel guides. The Lonely Planet's Dominican Republic guide provides great advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Walk the cobblestone streets, past beautifully restored mansions, churches and forts, many now converted into evocative museums and restaurants, in Santo Domingo's Zona Colonial; boat out to Bahia de Las Aguilas, a stunning 10km-long stretch of postcard-perfect sand nearly hugging Haiti's shores; or grab a front row seat and watch the thousands of humpback whales that congregate off the Peninsula de Samana­ to mate and give birth.

You'll find lots of useful information on the Dominican Republic Tourism Official Website.